The Michigan Personal Property Tax: Effects of Repeal on Michigan’s Economy and Tax Revenues, 2012

The Michigan Personal Property Tax (PPT) has attracted consistent criticism from Michigan’s business community. The pressure for reform has increased since a business tax credit worth 35% of PPT liability was repealed as part of this year’s business tax overhaul, which led to the creation of the new corporate income tax (CIT). The purpose of this report is twofold: to qualitatively discuss the effect of repealing the PPT on Michigan’s economy, and to describe the effects of repeal on local and state government tax revenues.

Dollars and Sense: How State and Local Governments in Michigan Spend Your Money

All Michigan residents have a vested interest in the economic future of our state. We need all hands on deck as we sort out the ideas, resources and action steps necessary to get us back on course toward prosperity and growth. This report is intended to provide ALL citizens with an assessment of the financial health of Michigan’s state and local governments. For every $7 earned in Michigan, $1 is sent to state and local government in the form of taxes, fees, and charges for services. As a taxpayer, you deserve to know what your dollars are buying, and have a voice in making sure those services and programs are going to be appropriate to righting our ship. This report provides information on:

  • How taxes and fees are collected and used across our state;
  • The long-term consequences of today’s budget decisions—borrowing, debt levels, budget reserves; and
  • The bills that are mounting for the future, such as public employee pensions and federal loans.

For this report, we have used the most recent information available. In most cases, this is for the 12-month period ending September 30, 2010. What does this report show? Largely, we find the following:
Michigan residents are earning less than a decade ago. Lower incomes mean less tax revenue and an increased need for government services. The result has been an ongoing structural imbalance in the state’s finances;
Many governments in Michigan are spending more than they are taking in. To support their spending, they have drained their savings, borrowed money, and failed to put money away for liabilities they know are on the horizon.
Michigan has been unable to invest in its future. State government expenditures on infrastructure and higher education, among other areas, have declined over the past decade;
State employee compensation in Michigan has grown while private sector compensation has fallen, inhibiting taxpayers’ ability to support the salaries and benefits of public employees, or to meet critical investment needs and assist Michigan citizens in financial distress. The state’s future has been mortgaged through extensive borrowing and accumulation of unfunded pension and retiree health care liabilities;
Years of high unemployment have rendered our unemployment compensation fund insolvent and created a greater demand for government services. Our system simply wasn’t built for this sustained level of hardship.

Please click “view PDF” below, for the full report. This report is also avilable at www.Michigan.gov/Snyder. 

Please click here for a Supplemental Data Appendix.

 

Fiscal Stability Assessment: Collier County, Florida

economic & financial

Study: Tax credit efficient use of dollars

Detroit Free Press,

Economic Benefits of the Earned Income Tax Credit in Michigan

The Michigan Association of United Ways and the Community Economic Development Association of Michigan commissioned Anderson Economic Group to analyze the economic benefits to local economies of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) in Michigan. This report builds upon our two previous reports and uses new data to estimate the usage of the EITC among low-income households, and the net economic impact by county due to new spending from EITC refunds.

Movie Incentives Hurting Michigan?

 NBC 10

Automaker Bankruptcy Would Cost Taxpayers Four Times More Than Amount of Federal Bridge Loans

 

A Hand Up for Michigan Workers: MEITC

The Michigan Catholic Conference (MCC) commissioned Anderson Economic Group (AEG) to update our 2002 report A Hand Up for Michigan Workers: Creating a State Earned Income Tax Credit. The MCC commissioned the original report to provide policymakers with the necessary data and analysis to make a decision regarding the creation of a Michigan Earned Income Tax Credit (MEITC). The MCC supported the passage of a state EITC and has advocated for the refundable tax credit as a way to help families work their way out of poverty.

Since the release of the original report, the Michigan Legislature passed and Governor Jennifer Granholm signed into law the MEITC. The credit will go into effect beginning in tax year 2008. In this report we explain how the MEITC will work, the rationale for having a state EITC, and estimate the likely cost of the MEITC to the state using information not available in 2002.

Benefits Outweigh Burdens for Blue Cross

AEG

Benchmarking for Success: A Comparison of State Business Taxes

Benchmarking for Success, one of three reports prepared for the MI House Of Representatives