Big Dilemma for Big Ten: COVID-19 in Four Big Ten Conference States

Two-wave model shows trajectory for Michigan, Minnesota, Indiana, and Wisconsin July 24, 2020–East Lansing, MI: The Midwest is home to some of the largest colleges and universities in the country. These institutions are grappling with the challenges of safely reopening in the fall, whether it be online or in-person. Among these choices are how to […]

Los Angeles Dodgers Owners Want to Sell Part of the Team

Bloomberg News,

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The Best Predictor Of The Presidential Election: Is It The Winner Of The World Series?

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Stocks say Trump! Cubs say Clinton!

USA Today,

The Economic Impact of University of Michigan Football in the Ann Arbor Area

 

Super Bowl's economic impact: Ticket prices, player payday—and stadium fast facts

 Crain’s Detroit,

New Detroit hockey arena likely to face funding hurdles

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Likely Economic Impact to Ireland from the 2006 Ryder Cup

Watkins, O’Neill

Analysis of the 2006 Ryder Cup’s likely economic impact on the country of Ireland, prepared jointly by Anderson Economic Group of East Lansing, Michigan, and Anarach Consulting, or Dublin, Ireland.

The Likely Economic Impact of a Chicago 2016 Summer Olympics

Anderson Economic Group, LLC, is an economic consulting firm with offices in Chicago, Illinois; East Lansing, Michigan; and Los Angeles, California. We have prepared this independent analysis of the likely economic impact of the proposed 2016 Summer Olympics in Chicago, and are making it publicly available before the IOC announcement date of October 2, 2009.

We are preparing this study to provide other Chicago-area businesses, as well as taxpayers and policymakers, a realistic assessment of the actual costs and benefits of hosting the games. Our analysis of past major events, and our past evaluations of the value of sports-related and other businesses, gives us a unique position to carefully examine this question.

Boosters of large sporting events and stadium construction have sometimes claimed economic benefits that later proved far too good to be true. However, our analyses of both sports franchises, and cities in which sporting teams oper-ate, show that some events can provide economic benefits that far exceed the costs. Given the scale of the Olympics, and the exposure it would give to Chi-cago on a world stage, it is certainly worth carefully considering the costs, risks, and benefits.

We have used a rigorous methodology to estimate the likelly economic impact of events like the 2016 Summer Olympics.