The URC's Support for Advanced Manufacturing in Michigan

Manufacturing is embedded in our state’s history, and in our national consciousness, as the engine of economic growth for much of the 20th century. Michigan was the “arsenal of democracy” in World War II, where Henry Ford’s revolutionary wages brought immigrants from numerous countries, and where companies like General Motors, Chrysler, and Ford grew into global enterprises.

Michigan is also the place that, far too often, is saddled with a reputation for being very good at something that is no longer relevant, modern, or particularly useful in the 21st century. In particular, we suffer from the misguided notion that manufacturing is not a “high tech” or high-value-added enterprise. This report provides, in great detail, hard evidence that manufacturing is alive and vital in Michigan today, and that much of the manufacturing done in Michigan today is high-tech, high-productivity advanced manufacturing.

Indeed, there are numerous places in the world where low-tech manufacturing can take place, often where labor and other costs are much lower than in the United States. Manufacturers in Michigan, therefore, must produce high-quality products using high-productivity techniques, and advanced technologies. As we note in this report, advanced manufacturing in Michigan is:

  • An important industry that employs over 10% of the state’s workforce;
  • A productive industry where over half of the employment is in firms whose productivity is growing faster than the average U.S. manufacturing firm;
  • A highly-skilled industry where over one-third of the research and testing jobs in the Midwest are located. 

 

Mixed-Use Market Study and Development Strategy: Northern Michigan University, Marquette

Northern Michigan University retained Anderson Economic Group to conduct a market study and strategy for the development of university owned property in Marquette, Michigan. The commission of this report opened the opportunity for the proactive planning of future development efforts, the return of underutilized property to productive uses, and the physical and social connection of the campus and community.

Our approach began with a field assessment in Marquette, followed by community outreach through online surveying, meetings with community stakeholders, and focus groups for the business community, area residents, university faculty and staff, and students. Findings from the community engagement helped to qualify results from our retail and residential supply and demand analyses, which identified opportunity for growth in various retail categories and housing value brackets to complement the existing stock. Our recommendations included illustrative development plans for the property, and specific development guidelines and tenant recommendations to enliven the area, connect the campus to the community, and bring in each element of living, working, and playing.

We provided the university with a full report which included an executive summary and appendices that contained explanations of the methodology used, detailed findings from the analyses, custom maps, and results from the community engagement process. We also provide pro forma financial models for the development to illustrate the financial considerations related to the project.

Michigan’s URC rises in rankings: R&D, high tech climbs

 

University Research Corridor director named

 The Detroit News,

Michigan's University Research Corridor: Second Annual Economic Impact Report

The University Research Corridor (URC) is an alliance of Michigan’s three largest academic institutions: Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University. In 2007 the URC universities asked Anderson Economic Group to undertake the first comprehensive study that benchmarks the economic impact of the URC’s activities on Michigan’s economy. This 2008 report is the second in a series of annual reports. While many benchmarks will likely not show large changes from year to year, over time these reports will reveal trends.

 

 

 

 

The URC had 135,816 students enrolled in the fall of 2007. This is an increase of 5.8% from the fall of 2001, and 1.9% higher than 2006. The students at the URC universities are drawn from throughout Michigan and around the world. Students from Michigan accounted for 77% of total enrollment in the fall of 2007, while 14% came from elsewhere in the U.S. and the remaining 9% came from other countries or territories. The URC has students from every county in Michigan, every state, and more than 150 countries.

Preliminary Report: Alternative Energy Research and Development in the URC

A preliminary report released in May by Anderson Economic Group found that Michigan’s University Research Corridor (URC), an alliance of Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University, makes significant contributions to the state’s economy.

 

In its report, AEG found that the URC spent $6.5 billion on operations in fiscal year 2006. This figure—$6.5 billion–is about 2% of all economic activity in Michigan, as measured by Michigan’s gross state product. Most operational spending went towards teaching, research, and University of Michigan’s Hospital.

 

Furthermore, AEG estimated that currently over 617,000 alumni of a URC institution live in Michigan. There is at least one URC alumni living in every Michigan county. URC alumni living in Michigan earned an estimated $24.3 billion in 2006, making up 13% of all wage and salary income in Michigan.

 

The AEG report also compared how research and tech transfer activities at Michigan’s URC compare with other well-known university clusters in Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. Peer university clusters include Harvard, MIT, and Tufts in Massachusetts; Duke, University of North Carolina, and North Carolina State in North Carolina; and Penn State, Carnegie Mellon, and University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania.

Michigan's University Research Corridor: First Annual Economic Impact Report

Sallee, Anderson

The economic impact of Michigan’s University Research Corridor (URC). Michigan State, Wayne State, University of Michigan.

The Economic Benefits of the University Research Corridor (preliminary report)

Anderson, Sallee

What would the loss be to the state if the Research Corridor universities (URC) left Michigan? Also benchmarks the URC’s economic contributions to the state in terms of jobs, earnings, economic development activities, and tax revenue.

The Economic Impact of Michigan State University

Sallee, Rosaen, Anderson

An analysis of the net economic impact and economic benefits that Michigan State University (MSU) provides the State of Michigan

Preliminary Report: The Economic Benefits of the University Research Corridor

The University Research Corridor (URC) is an alliance of Michigan’s three largest academic institutions: Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University. The purpose of this alliance is to accelerate economic development in Michigan by educating students, attracting talented workers to Michigan, supporting innovation, and encouraging the transfer of technology to the private sector.

The URC asked Anderson Economic Group to undertake a comprehensive study to quantify the economic impact of the Research Corridor universities’ activities on Michigan’s economy. The first annual report will answer the question: What would the loss be to the state if the Research Corridor universities left Michigan? The report will then measure and benchmark the URC’s economic contributions to the state in terms of jobs, earnings, economic development activities, and tax revenue.

This document is a preview to the first annual report and lays the foundation for the economic impact analysis in that report.