Property Tax Analysis; Federal and State Non-Profit Regulatory Advice: PG&E Generating – Michigan

Case Study:
Property Tax Analysis
Federal and State Non-Profit Regulatory Advice
PG&E Generating – Michigan 


PG&E Generating is a national energy provider that owns and operates merchant generating plants across the country.

Anderson Economic Group assisted PG&E by conducting an economic assessment of a proposed development site. The assessment was used by PG&E, as well as the local community, to secure a tax free Renaissance Zone designation for the site. Furthermore, we provided a sophisticated analysis of the likely property tax burden on the $500 million project. We created a simulation model to project tax bur­dens under various scenarios, and identified specific strategies to minimize tax costs. We also identified tax levies that were outside legal limits.

Finally, we assisted PG&E in identifying the proper structure for a $1 mil­lion contribution to aid the citizens of the local area, given state and federal laws regarding tax-exempt organizations, and eligibility for state tax credits.

Business Climate Surveying: State of Wisconsin


The State of Wisconsin, as part of an effort to ensure economic growth, retained Anderson Economic Group to research the business climate through a survey of business leaders, and to prepare a report on the survey results and strategy recommendations.

AEG worked with Mitchell Research & Communications, an East Lansing, Michigan market research firm, to develop and implement a research strategy to collect qualitative and quantitative data. This included surveying nearly 400 business leaders, and collecting demographic, market, policy, and business operation data. The data was then analyzed, and strategies formulated to help the State maintain and attract employers.

The final report was presented to state policymakers, including Governor McCallum, for use in the development of a statewide plan.

Interstate Commerce Clause & Taxation Analysis: Multinational Industrial Firm


Our client was one of the United States leading engineering and manufacturing companies, specialized in water and wastewater treatment and industrial processes, defense electronics and services, electronic components such as connectors and switches, and a wide range of other industrial products.

When our client sold a subsidiary that provided components to automotive manufacturers, the State of Michigan charged the firm with a very large Single Business Tax (“SBT”) liability. The SBT is a value-added tax (VAT), unique within the United States, though common in Europe and Canada. For a suit filed against the State of Michigan, we prepared a report and affidavit which described how the application of the tax in this manner would violate the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution. For the report, we:

-Reviewed value-added taxation in general

-Reviewed Michigan’s SBT in particular

-Reviewed the past interstate commerce cases relating to taxation and state actions violating interstate commerce

-Summarized the structure of the auto industry

-Analyzed how the application of the Michigan SBT in this matter infringed interstate commerce, was contrary to the purpose of the SBT, and resulted in perverse tax treatment of this company and, potentially, many others.

Before the report was presented in court, the State made an acceptable settlement with our client, based partially on the record established by our report.

Competitive Responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards

Ilhan K. Geckil

Article in NABE by Ilhan Geckil on CAFÉ.

Likely Impact of Delphi Bankruptcy

On October 8, 2005, Delphi Corporation filed for bankruptcy protection in New York. Given the difficulties of the company, including unprofitable operations and repeatedly severe statements by the company’s management about its uncompetitive cost structure, especially its “legacy costs,” the action was not unexpected.

Delphi, the largest auto parts supplier in the U.S. (and number two worldwide), employs 50,600 workers in the United States and Canada. Headquartered in Troy, Michigan, Delphi is an integral component of Michigan’s economy and the national auto industry. Given its size, Delphi’s bankruptcy filing was widely expected to have far-reaching consequences for not only Delphi’s workers, but also the state and national economy, automakers, and auto parts suppliers.

The purpose of this analysis is to provide an early indication of the likely consequences of the Delphi bankruptcy. Given our past analyses of work stoppages, interruptions, blackouts, and other events that have shut down production in the United States; and our extensive knowledge of the automobile industry; we have background knowledge from which to draw some preliminary conclusions. This is a preliminary assessment of likely events that will be played out over a two or three-year period, and useful for planning and the assessment of risks. However, we caution readers that the future is, of course, unknowable.

The Economic Benefits of Wayne State University

Anderson, Geckil, Watkins

A report on the economic benefits of Wayne State University

The Life Sciences Industry in Michigan: Employment, Economic, and Fiscal Contributions to the State's Economy

Anderson, Watkins

An analysis of the Life Sciences Industry’s employment, economic, and fiscal contributions to the Michigan economy

Northeast Blackout Likely to Reduce US Earnings by $6.4 Billion: AEG Working Paper 2003-2

Anderson, Geckil

This working paper summarizes the economic effects of the 2003 blackout on residents of the United States.

Flash Estimate: Impact of West Coast Port Shutdown

Anderson, Geckil

An estimate of lost earnings due to the West Coast Port Shutdown.

North Carolina Workforce Development Summit: Recommendations and Analysis

Patrick L. Anderson, Christopher S. Cotton, Christine A. LeNet