I-70 Widening Project: EDR Group – Columbia, Missouri

Case Study:
I-70 Widening Project
Economic and Market Analysis – Columbia, Missouri


Anderson Economic was commissioned by The Economic Development Research Group of Boston to study the effects of widening the I-70 freeway in Columbia Missouri. The EDR group requested that AEG complete an analysis of the possible relocation of businesses that were to be demolished during the freeway construction project.

The Missouri Department of Transportation, with the assistance of several consulting firms, is currently preparing plans for the future widening and reconstruction of I-70 across the state from St. Louis to Kansas City. In Columbia, MoDOT has determined that widening I-70 in its present location is the best course of action based on traffic projections and input from a citizen advisory group and the general public.

Anderson Economic Group provided a detailed analysis concerning the impact of widening the I-70 freeway in Columbia, Missouri . The widening project will affect businesses in the right-of-way of the freeway. These businesses will be displaced and special consideration was given regarding the relocation viability of the businesses. The analysis placed special emphasis on how the project would impact employment by category, relocation concerns, and appraisal values in the study area.

AEG presented the findings of the report to the City of Columbia and they used our analysis to minimize the impact of the widening project on existing businesses.

Retail Market Analysis and Feasibility Study: The Taubman Company – Nassau County, New York

Case Study:
Retail Market Analysis and Feasibility Study
The Taubman Company – Nassau County, New York


The Taubman Company, a nationally known developer with 30 premier shopping centers throughout the United States, retained Anderson Economic Group to conduct a market study assessing the supportability of a proposed regional shopping center in Nassau County, New York. The market area is affluent but very competitive, and the proposed regional mall received strong resistance from community residents who did not want just another mall.

Anderson Economic Group conducted a quantitative analysis that included detailed field work and retail inventories, analysis of resident demographics and resident expenditure patterns on department stores and other retail categories, and an evaluation of site characteristics. We detailed the benefits and risks of the project, and formulated an achievable tenant mix for the project.

The results of our analysis indicated sufficient market support for the proposed mall, to be anchored by Neiman Marcus, Lord & Taylor, and a selection of other fashion tenants. The project’s success will depend on a high-quality project and creation of an enjoyable, entertaining and pedestrian-friendly shopping environment, with a recommended tenant mix that encourages shopping, dining and other activities that extend into the evening hours.

Likely Impact of Delphi Bankruptcy

On October 8, 2005, Delphi Corporation filed for bankruptcy protection in New York. Given the difficulties of the company, including unprofitable operations and repeatedly severe statements by the company’s management about its uncompetitive cost structure, especially its “legacy costs,” the action was not unexpected.

Delphi, the largest auto parts supplier in the U.S. (and number two worldwide), employs 50,600 workers in the United States and Canada. Headquartered in Troy, Michigan, Delphi is an integral component of Michigan’s economy and the national auto industry. Given its size, Delphi’s bankruptcy filing was widely expected to have far-reaching consequences for not only Delphi’s workers, but also the state and national economy, automakers, and auto parts suppliers.

The purpose of this analysis is to provide an early indication of the likely consequences of the Delphi bankruptcy. Given our past analyses of work stoppages, interruptions, blackouts, and other events that have shut down production in the United States; and our extensive knowledge of the automobile industry; we have background knowledge from which to draw some preliminary conclusions. This is a preliminary assessment of likely events that will be played out over a two or three-year period, and useful for planning and the assessment of risks. However, we caution readers that the future is, of course, unknowable.

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