$20M settlement reached for U.S. Consumers of Beck’s Beer

 

Commercial Damages Expert Report: Alaska Rent-A-Car vs. Avis Budget Group, Federal District Court

 

Expert Report on Economic Consequences of Disallowing Nonrecourse Protection in Commercial Lending

 

Automotive Dealership Arbitrations: Seventy-three General Motors and Chrysler Dealerships

Following the termination of over 1,000 dealerships by General Motors and nearly 800 by Chrysler, federal legislation (HR 3288, Sec 747) was introduced to provide a procedure for the review of the termination decisions. The bill, signed into law on December 16 of 2009, established criteria for the arbitration process, which was organized through the American Arbitration Association. Among the criteria that arbitrators were to consider were the dealership’s profitability, economic viability, market territory, sales performance metrics, and the manufacturer’s business plan.

Seventy-three of the dealerships that pursued arbitration retained Anderson Economic Group for expert analysis in the areas of demography, geography, sales performance analysis, economic viability, and financial analyses. These dealers were located across 23 different states. Fifty-five were General Motors dealerships, and 18 were Chrysler dealerships.

We worked with each dealership to develop a plan of work that focused on the critical elements of their case. These included geographic and demographic assessments to determine if trade area’s were properly assigned, and if performance metrics accurately accounted for local market conditions. In a number of cases we also provided financial analyses to measure the economic viability of a dealership from a profitability standpoint, and to benchmark historic financial performance against an industry average. We also assessed the overall industry structure, economic conditions, and the business plans that manufacturer’s cited as reasons to support dealership terminations. In doing so we were able to illustrate inconsistencies in their positions, and demonstrate that, in many instances, the termination of dealerships was actually harmful to the manufacturer’s economic interests. We also provided consultation regarding settlement and hearing strategies, as well as rebuttal to opposing expert analyses.

Our analyses were used by dealerships to evaluate the strength of their case, to negotiate favorable settlements prior to arbitration, and in 19 cases our experts presented findings before an arbitrator. By the end of the arbitration process more than 90 percent of our clients had received favorable financial settlements, or had been reinstated as dealerships.

Financial Evaluation and Market Value Analysis: Williams v. Anheuser-Busch

 

An Auto Dealer's Guide to Arbitration

This guide is for dealers that are considering participating in the arbitration process established by H.R. 3288, which was signed in to law by President Obama on December 16, 2009. It reviews the timeline and arbitration process, and the criteria that will be considered by the arbitrator. It concludes with some practical steps dealers should take as they consider whether to participate in the arbitration process.

Countries, Tastes, and the Value of Beer Franchises in the United States

Patrick L. Anderson and Ilhan K. Geckil

A review of valuation methods in the alcoholic beverage industry.

The Value of Private Businesses in the United States

The vast majority of businesses in the United States are privately held, and approximately 99 percent meet a common government definition of “small.” However, we know surprisingly little about the market values of these organizations. In this paper, we estimate the market value of privately held firms in the United States from sources on earnings, assets, and reported market value of multiple forms of business entities, including corporations, partnerships, LLCs, and sole proprietorships. We discuss various theoretical and practical methods of valuing assets, including those arising from economics, neoclassical finance, portfolio theory, and tradition. Concluding that most of them are not appropriate for valuing private firms, we use insights from dynamic programming and ratio analyses from traditional technique to produce a new estimate based on reported taxable earnings, net worth, and tax filing status. Using this approach, we estimate that privately held U.S. firms had earnings that exceeded those of publicly held firms in two recent years by a significant margin. Moreover, the market value of these firms exceeded that of publicly traded firms. We also conclude that policymakers, perhaps grossly, underestimate the true scale of “small” and privately held firms in the economy.

 

Information on Business Economics as well as this article can be found on NABE’s website (Vol. 44 No. 2). Or you can contact us if you are interested in viewing an author copy.

Economic Damages Valuation: Patent Infringement

A small law firm in Toledo, Ohio retained AEG to calculate economic damages, after a chiropractor invented an orthopedic pillow. The pillow was designed to be placed between a person’s knees while sleeping to reduce back pain. In 2000, n was sued by Banyan Licensing on a claim that they had superior rights to the design through an existing patent.

The suit at hand was a legal malpractice suit where Anderson Economic Group calculated the chiropractor’s lost ability to collect royalty payments from the sale of the orthopedic pillow in the United States.

We prepared an expert report. Patrick Anderson provided deposition testimony about the report. Mr. Anderson also testified in the Court in Toledo. In addition, we provided an analysis of the opposing expert’s report, and questions to be posed to the opposing expert.

After the trial, AEG’s client got a favorable settlement offer.

Outsourcing Valuation Analysis: Cooper Wiring Devices, Inc.


A law firm engaged Anderson Economic Group, LLC on behalf of Cooper Wiring Devices, Inc. to examine outsourcing and to consider its impact specifically, the impact on consumers and the macroeconomic implications as a whole.

Our report first discusses the history of outsourcing, the economic theories, some important political turning points and the fundamental reasons companies outsource. We reviewed the prevalence of outsourcing and employment as well as the relationship between outsourcing and quality. Profiles of well known global companies in various business sectors that have chosen to outsource, such as Boeing and Xerox, were also analyzed.

Finally, we reviewed the outsourcing behavior of six competitors of Cooper Wiring Devices, including Leviton, and provided data showing what all six companies had outsourced to China and Mexico. We discuss why outsourcing is such an important business strategy for well run companies that must stay competitive in a global environment if they want to survive.